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If I hear someone say "As for the economy, we should talk about America", can I ask "What should we talk about America as for?" ?

I'm curious if we can ask these sorts of questions.

  • What should we talk about America as for? We should talk about America as for the economy.
  • What day does our contract end as of? Our contract ends as of June, 3rd.
  • What should I continue to improve regardless of? You should continue to improve regardless of your past failures.
  • What did you feel bad prior to? Prior to seeing her again, I felt bad.

Are these questions grammatically okay?

I think they are.

Thank you.

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  • "As for the economy" here means "While we're on the subject of the economy, we should talk about America." Inverting the sentence doesn't really make sense. May 22 at 9:16
  • What about using a comma there? "We should talk about America, as of the economy."
    – Jawel7
    May 22 at 10:27
  • Thar doesn't make sense either. As Collins says, America is introduced as a new topic (perhaps the previous conversation had been about the economy of another country). May 22 at 15:33
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All of the question examples sound awkward.

  1. What should we talk about America as for?
    The expression "as for" doesn't mean what you think it does. It is a way of introducing the rest of the sentence, equivalent to "as to", "with regard to", or "concerning", or "on the subject of the economy". It doesn't have a grammatical connection to the rest of the sentence. This statement is pure assertion, and I don't see any way to turn it into a question in the way you want to.

  2. What day does our contract end as of?
    For this example, the question could simply drop the "of", or if you want to keep it, "As of what day does our contract end?"

  3. What should I continue to improve regardless of?
    This is another example of an assertion that can't logically be turned into a question. No one would ask "What should I ignore as I continue to improve?"

  4. What did you feel bad prior to?
    This doesn't make sense either. A natural question would be "When did you start feeling bad?", and that question might elicit the answer "I felt bad prior to seeing her."

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  • What I didn't understand is why "What did you feel bad prior to" doesn't make any sense while "Who did you sit next to" does. What's the difference? Everything seems the same to me.
    – Jawel7
    May 22 at 8:27
  • They are both grammatical, but the first one isn't something I can imagine anyone saying, while the second one seems quite reasonable. May 22 at 11:42

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