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https://www.google.com/search?q=husk+meaning defines husk as:

  • noun: the dry outer covering of some fruits or seeds. "the fibrous husk of the coconut"
  • verb: remove the husk or husks from. "they set up mills to husk the rice".

Then wikidiff says husked means "covered with a husk.", and I see on Google that the terms "dehusked coconut" and "unhusked coconut" are used as well.

This confuses me. Does a husked coconut still have its husk?

I'd say yes based on the noun sense and adjective definition from wikidiff, but no based on the verb sense. I don't get how the adjective definition can be the contrary of the verb sense, but at the time the existence of terms "dehusked coconut" and "unhusked coconut" may seem to indicate that wikidiff may be correct. Hence my confusion. Or maybe that's simply an autantonym?


With husk:

enter image description here

Without husk:

enter image description here

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    If something is 'husked' then it has no husk any more. 'Husk' is being used as a verb. 'Dehusk' and 'unhusk' are alternatives for people who might not understand coconut trade jargon. May 23, 2021 at 20:05
  • @MichaelHarvey Thanks, that'd make sense, but wikidiff.com/husked/…. says husked="covered with a husk.". Maybe they're incorrect? May 23, 2021 at 20:10
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    Wikidiff is unreliable. A lot of its entries seem to be written by a bot. In this case it gives 'husked' meaning 'with a husk' from a 1913 dictionary. May 23, 2021 at 20:13
  • Coconuts have husks until you remove them. corn husk, too.
    – Lambie
    May 23, 2021 at 20:22
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    No, it does not. Peeled apple. Husked corn. [no husk]. Michael already said it.
    – Lambie
    May 23, 2021 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

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These terms are (like "seeded", or "dusted") ambiguous in English.

You can avoid the ambiguity with expressions like "coconut in its husk" or "de-husked coconut".

Without further context I'd generally expect a husked coconut to be the result of an action, and since the husk is a natural part of the coconut, the action is to remove it. So without any other context, I'd guess that "husked coconut" means one with the husk removed.

On the other hand in the UK coconuts are nearly always sold huskless. So there is no need to emphasise this, so I'd assume that "husked" means the special type that still has its husk

Here you see, I've convinced myself of both answers... It is a real ambiguity in English.

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    Glad you've got it, because I evidently don't!
    – James K
    May 23, 2021 at 20:43
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    Well, what I've got from this is that's "husked" is a useless autantonym that I should stay away from :) and instead use either "in its husk" or "un/dehusked" as you suggested, which I just did cooking.stackexchange.com/q/115775/10703 May 23, 2021 at 20:46
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    It can be confusing. 'Skinned', 'peeled', yet 'furred', 'coated'. May 23, 2021 at 20:54
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That isn't a husked cocoanut, though. It's only partially husked. The coir, the coarse fiber of the outer husk of a cocoanut, is just that, the outer husk. The inner husk still remains. Just the coir of that cocoanut's husk has been removed, so only the outer surface of the husk has been removed. The remainder of the husk remains, so that's not a husked cocoanut but at best a partially husked cocoanut, the part that is the coir being the only part of the husk that's been removed.

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