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I have two sentences 'It will correctly be identified as X.' and 'It will be correctly identified as X.' I was wondering is one of them incorrect grammatically perhaps? or do they both mean the same thing without grammatical issues? Thank you!

2 Answers 2

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They are both fine grammatically. Actually, I would tend to use a third form:

It will be identified correctly as X.

But they all mean the same, and are all perfectly good English.

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Both are incorrect. Until something is identified you cannot know what it will be.

'It will be correctly identified" is a correct statement

'It was correctly identified as X.' is a correct statement

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    I disagree. The question is about grammar, not semantics. "The moon is made of green cheese." is false, but it's grammatically fine.
    – tkp
    Jun 23 at 0:10
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    I can imagine a trial attorney arguing his case to the jury about a piece of evidence, saying, "It will be correctly identified as X by our next witness." Jun 23 at 2:10

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