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I remember hearing a sentence with the word "one".

For example:

There are three tomatoes. Two of them are red. The ones being red are so delicious.

Is the usage of "the ones" correct? I don't even know if there is a usage like that. And I've also tried to reduce the clause "that are red" into "being red" but I'm not sure if it's true or not. I'd be grateful if you could answer both of these questions.

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    Normally you would say The red ones are delicious. The ones being red is not only clunky, but also sounds weird. Also, ones here replaces tomatoes, and so it's a pronoun.
    – user40475
    Jun 5 '21 at 15:29
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    Or 'The ones that are red ...' (strongly hinting that the green one hasn't ripened yet). 'So delicious' sounds a little odd as 'delicious' is an extreme adjective, resisting grading. Jun 5 '21 at 15:39
  • Firstly, thank you for the answers. Secondly, can I use the word "one" like the true form of my example. If there is a clause as "one" can you give an example.
    – Alp Arda
    Jun 5 '21 at 15:49
  • "I've bought two cakes. The one on the blue plate is for you." Jun 5 '21 at 17:18
  • 'There are some tomatoes in the bowl. Some of them are still green. The ones that are red are delicious.' Jun 5 '21 at 18:38
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Normally you would say The red ones are delicious, Or 'The ones that are red ...' (strongly hinting that the green one hasn't ripened yet). The ones being red is not only clunky, but also sounds weird. Also, ones here replaces tomatoes, and so it's a pronoun.

'So delicious' sounds a little odd as 'delicious' is an extreme adjective, resisting grading.

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  • Converting comments to an answer.
    – James K
    Jun 5 '21 at 15:58

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