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For example,

This has made it all the more necessary for us to convey that method.

I saw the translation was "consequently, we should insist on conveying that method" in another language, but why it was changed into "made it all the more necessary"? What's the meaning of "all"?
It really puzzled me.

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  • Sorry, but what translation? [Why was it changed to etc.]
    – Lambie
    Jun 5 '21 at 15:08
  • 'This has made it necessary for us to convey that method.' ~ 'This has made it even more necessary for us to convey that method.' = 'This has made it all the more necessary for us to convey that method.' The last two seem illogical ('necessary' is absolute) but are acceptable, idiomatic, having a pragmatic implication (emphasis). Jun 5 '21 at 15:14
  • They have voted to close, but here are some clues for you: make it necessary to [do something]. It is a dummy pronoun. alll the more= even more.
    – Lambie
    Jun 5 '21 at 15:14
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I believe that "all the more" is confusing part. "all the more" means "even more". From Merriam-Webster

all the more: even more

The fact that they'd written the play themselves made it all the more impressive.

"Much more" would be another alternate.

If you substitute "even more" and "much more" into your example for "all the more" you get:

  • This has made it even more necessary for us to convey that method.

  • This has made it much more necessary for us to convey that method.

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