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I was hit by a ball in the arm. There were no circles in my arm. I drew a circle around a painful part, so I had a pain in a circular mark. If a circular mark is removed, then how can I exactly express this situation? I think saying ‘a circular pain’ or ‘a pain in a circular part’ without a circle is awkward.

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  • I'm curious. Is that how you'd refer to it in your own language -- a "circular pain" when no circle exists? Jun 7 at 1:24
  • @FeliniusRex Yes my language is not that logical.
    – user137971
    Jun 7 at 1:31
  • “Area” or “the area where the ball hit me.” I can’t think of an instance where one would describe the pain itself geometrically.
    – CodeGnome
    Jun 7 at 1:40
  • Ok, I was just curious. In English, you'd describe where you were hit by saying "in the arm" (not specific), or you'd refer to another part of the arm -- "just above the elbow". To cover how it looks, feels, and where it's located, it's better to use more than one sentence. Example: "I was hit by a ball in the arm just above the elbow. The ball left a circular mark which throbbed painfully." Jun 7 at 1:41
  • If you were hit in the arm, and you wanted to tell someone exactly where, you'd say "I was hit right here, and it hurts!", while pointing to the painful area on your arm with the pointer finger of the opposite hand. Jun 7 at 1:54
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Q. If a circular mark is removed, then how can I exactly express this situation?

A. The literal answer to your question is "A circular mark has been removed!"

If you were to ask the question "If the circular mark is removed, then how can I exactly express this situation? then I would answer

It hurts right here (indicate position), where I drew a circle but then later removed it.

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