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I’m not sure about the position of somewhere in this sentence:

I lost the photo I took when I went to Hiroshima somewhere.

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  • "went to somewhere in Hiroshima" (if you are meaning to say that you went to some place in Hiroshima). Else, "when I went to Hiroshima" would suffice.
    – Ammu
    Jun 7, 2021 at 17:58
  • It is unclear whether the (unspecified) photo was lost somewhere in Hiroshima, or a photo was taken (made) somewhere in Hiroshima and lost elsewhere. Jun 7, 2021 at 18:13
  • @WeatherVane Post the two alternative rewrites in your comment as an answer. Jun 7, 2021 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

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It is unclear which of these two meanings was intended:

  • the (unspecified) photo was lost somewhere in Hiroshima

  • a photo was taken (made) somewhere in Hiroshima and lost elsewhere

If it was the first, I would rewrite

I lost the photo I took when I went to Hiroshima somewhere

as

I lost the photo when I went to Hiroshima

and if the second was meant:

I can't find the photo I took in Hiroshima

These don't use 'somewhere' at all, because it isn't necessary and it confuses the meaning.

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  • I would propose a third option, which is IMO the most likely intended meaning: the photo, which was taken in Hiroshima, was lost somewhere (presumably nearby, i.e. in the speaker's home/car/office).
    – randomhead
    Jun 7, 2021 at 19:02
  • @randomhead that's a valid difference, I avoided the word 'somewhere' because sth is always lost 'somewhere' and not 'nowhere'. Jun 7, 2021 at 19:05
  • True, something can't be lost "nowhere," but the addition of "somewhere" imparts a different meaning than simply not mentioning any "where" at all
    – randomhead
    Jun 7, 2021 at 19:20
  • @randomhead but that isn't a third interpretation really: the confusion is when the photo was lost. Jun 7, 2021 at 19:23

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