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1- (I - implied subject) Thank you for being a good listener

unshortened situation: I thank you because you are a good listener

2- (You - implied subject) Promise her for being a good listener

unshortened situation: You promise her because she is a good listener

3- She is famous for being a good listener.

unshortened situation: She is famous because she is a good listener

Third sentence is grammatically correct, but first and second sentences are not grammatically correct because there are dangling modifier in the sentences.

Second question: Is this situation valid for imperative sentences or only thank-you sentence?

Thank you for your answer in advance

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For a "Dangling modifier" first we need a modifier then we must have nothing (no subject) to modify.

A modifier describes or qualifies another part of a sentence. A dangling modifier occurs when the intended subject of the modifier is missing from the sentence, and instead another subject appears in its place.

Dangling modifiers often take the form of an introductory phrase that is connected to the wrong thing.

Recognizing dangling modifiers In a correct sentence, the subject (or doer) that is modified should immediately follow the comma after the modifier.

For further information please follow this link Recognizing dangling modifiers


Regarding your examples. I would suggest you do not have dangling modifiers as such. In the first example your interpretation of the meaning is incorrect, the second example is just an incorrect/incomplete sentence and the third is irrelevant even by your own hand. It is just a statement.


Thank you for being a good listener

Implied; I am thanking you because you have listened to me attentively.*


Promise her for being a good listener

promise her what? this sentence makes no sense.

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  • Then let me say a "reduced adverb clauses in the imperative sentences" instead of "dangling modifier". Your example is: "ı am thanking you because you have listened to me" attentively, but it's incorrect because if there are two different subject and two independent sentence that sentence can not be do the reduced adverb clause. You think is this a exception for your example? Jun 9 at 18:27

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