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  1. Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand.

  2. Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand watching.

  3. Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand it.

Is the first sentence grammatically incorrect?

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  • Initially I made a comment stating the same thing I am going to write now, but then deleted it. It was my instant guess. But as I am thinking more and more about it, it seems like I was not incorrect. Your first sentence is correct but I am doubtful of your last sentence. Jun 8 at 4:29
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Consider the following sentence:

John is [old but string].

Here but is a coordinator. The coordination here is [old but string]. The coordinator joins two elements old and strong, called coordinates. Notice here that both old and strong are under same category. Both are adjectives. There is however no reason to think that a coordinator joins just two elements of same category. What they join together is the elements of same function:

The investigation team found out [his location and where he came from].

Here the elements that are joined together by the coordinator but is not of same category. his location is a Noun Phrase but where he came from is a subordinate interrogative clause. But these two elements have the same function in the sentence - internal complement of the verb.

The investigation team found out his location.
The investigation team found out where he came from.

Now again consider the following sentence:

Al suggested a girl [he likes but not enough to marry].

Here it is called Gapped Coordination. Here the two elements are he likes and not enough to marry. The gap exists in the second element. he doesn't like [the girl] enough to marry.

[Here the girl is obligatorily dropped to make the sentence grammatical, it is anaphorically linked to an antecedent. It is a Relative construction.]

In view of the above discussion, let's take a look at the sentences OP wrote:

1. Give me a movie [everyone loves but you just can't stand]. [CORRECT]
2. Give me a movie [everyone loves but you just can't stand watching]. [CORRECT]
3. Give me a movie [everyone loves but you just can't stand it]. [INCORRECT]

In sentence #1 the two elements are everyone loves and you just can't stand. In both elements movie is omitted, and should be omitted because it is anaphorically linked to the antecedent.

Sentence #2 is similar. In sentence #2 the two elements are everyone loves and you just can't stand watching. In both elements movie is omitted, and should be omitted because it is anaphorically linked to the antecedent.

But your sentence #3 is incorrect because in the last element it is present which refers to movie that is anaphorically linked to the antecedent.

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As I keep repeating it not just about the grammar. Does the sentence make any sense? is it ambiguous? Context?

Give me a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand.

Yes it is grammatically correct but it is not a good sentence as it stands.

I do not understand the relation ship between me- but -you?.

Give me a movie everyone loves but I just can't stand.

It's a movie everyone loves but you just can't stand it.

Give me a movie everyone loves and you just can't stand.

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