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a. He has read more books than you have had dinners.

Meaning: The numbers of the books he has read is greater than the number of dinners you have had.

Is (a) grammatically correct?

It is supposed to be a hyperbolic statement of course. It's very probably not literally true.

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    Yes it's idiomatic and most unlikely to be literally true. Jun 11, 2021 at 21:19

3 Answers 3

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Usually "... than you've had hot dinners". It is a hyperbolic expression, used to express the idea of "a very large number". So in the example it means

He has read a lot of books.

But it is rather clichéd. It is humorous, but now the joke might be more parody. It is also notably British.

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This is grammatically correct.

The meaning is slightly different to what you have written. Although this made simply be a typo on your part.

It would mean: The numbers of the books he has read is greater than the number of dinners you have had

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It is correct.

In England, where I’m from, it is often said colloquially as “hot dinners” rather than just “dinners”.

It’s also somewhat “made” by a casual/abbreviated tone of voice, and would be said like:

He’s read more books than you’ve had hot dinners!

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