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The question is in the title. So, is it OK to say:

I don't mind walking home as long as you accompany me to go home.

Or is there an alternative expression else? I'm not really familiar with "accompany" by the way. I usually use "would you go with me" to avoid using "accompany" (if that's appropriate in this situation).

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"Accompany" is a fine word to use there, but it takes both a direct and an indirect object—you do not need the infinitive "to go:"

I don't mind walking home as long as you accompany me home.

You could insert (or substitute) a prepositional phrase:

I don't mind walking home as long as you accompany me along the way [home].

Alternatives to "accompany me home" might be

  • come along with me
  • come with me
  • come home with me
  • go with me
  • go along with me
  • join me
  • walk me home
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  • First, I'd like to say thanks for the answer. About the infinitive-to, can I use that in form of accompany+somebody+to+place. E.g. accompany me to the police station. Here's the related link about that use: google.com/…
    – user516076
    Jun 13, 2021 at 23:50
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    @user, the "to" used in that form is not part of an infinitive; it is a preposition connecting the verb and the object. It is necessary when the object takes an article: "accompany to the police station" and "accompany to the house" but "accompany home" without "to the."
    – randomhead
    Jun 14, 2021 at 0:01

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