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This maintenance plan is suitable for any individual or businesses who want to start with an affordable solution.

I have been thinking about this sentence for a while. I am clueless where to use plural or singular.

From Cambridge Dictionary "We use any before nouns to refer to indefinite or unknown quantities or an unlimited entity"

  1. This maintenance plan is suitable for any individual or business who wants to start with an affordable solution.
  2. This maintenance plan is suitable for any individuals or businesses who want to start with an affordable solution.
  3. This maintenance plan is suitable for any individual or businesses who want to start with an affordable solution.

May I ask if any of the above sentence is grammatically correct?

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    Who is not comfortable after business. That would be much more suitable (...that wants..."singular"). However, the easiest solution to your problem is to write around it: This maintenance plan is suitable for any individual or business wanting (to start with) an affordable solution. And you could easily omit the phrase in brackets. Jun 14, 2021 at 8:38
  • Is your goal to write this one sentence naturally, or to understand the grammar and how to determine the correct way to use this structure on your own in the future?
    – gotube
    Jun 14, 2021 at 23:05
  • HI @gotube, thanks for pointing that out. Would like to learn both. Jun 15, 2021 at 0:24

1 Answer 1

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"Any" can refer to indefinite or unknown quantities, so grammatically, it can have singular or plural nouns after it, but not both in the same phrase.

In terms of style, if the quantity of the noun is likely to be none or 1, or if the sentence refers to an unknown quantity of the noun, then singular nouns are preferred. If the quantity of the noun is likely to be plural, then plural nouns are preferred.

To your example: if this sentence is part of marketing directed at the consumer, who considers themselves or their business as a single entity, then singular is preferred: "... any individual or business that wants ...". However, if this sentence is part of a presentation to investors, who consider the whole market as many individuals and businesses, plural is better: "... any individuals or businesses that want ...".

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