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Class 1 has 50 students and Class 2 has 100 students. We say "Class 2 is twice as many students as class 1".

Class 1 has 50 students and Class 2 has 95 students. We say "Class 2 is almost/nearly twice as many students as class 1".

Class 1 has 50 students and Class 2 has 105 students. Can we say "Class 2 is just over twice as many students as class 1" or "Class 2 is just more than twice as many students as class 1"?

Class 1 has 50 students and Class 2 has 120 students. Can we say "Class 2 is far over twice as many students as class 1"?

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    You can certainly say just over twice as many, but your second alternative is non-idiomatic - should be far more than twice as many (or much more...). Jun 18, 2021 at 14:14

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Class X has... students... would be more idiomatic than class X is... students..., I think.
Apart from that, the only one that sounds odd is "far over twice"; you could just use "more than twice as many...".
Twenty percent more doesn't sound like "far over".

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Can we say “just over twice as many as”

Yes we can but we probably would not.


Can we sayfar over twice as many as”

I have never heard anyone use this expression; I would use "more than" or "far more than"


Class 2 has twice as many students as class 1".

This sentence is correct but is it how we would normally phrase it? I suggest not.

This is what we would probably write.

"Class 2 has twice, the students of class 1".

"Class 2 has nearly twice, the students of class 1".

"Class 2 has more than twice, the students of class 1".

This is what most of us (The Masses) would probably say.

"Class 2 has two times more students than class 1"

I went to the temple two times today.

QUOTE; In informal context, people tend to use two times more than telling twice. That is, when you speak with a friend or so, you use the word two times rather than twice. Ref Twice vs Two times

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    As a British English speaker I would almost never use two times when I meant twice! Jun 18, 2021 at 8:25
  • @KateBunting No doubt you would, but does everyone else? Quote from learning English; When it comes to twice, this is more often used than two times, although two times is also quite common in informal usage. Compare the following: bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/…
    – Brad
    Jun 18, 2021 at 8:50
  • What @KateBunting said. As this NGrams shows use it two times virtually "flatlines" by comparison with used it twice. I think you're mixing things up with the fact that we nearly always talk about using it three times rather than using it thrice. Jun 18, 2021 at 14:19
  • If you look on the net there are several publications that quite clearly state that for during informal speech two times is commonly used Now, just one small question How does NGrams gather it's data for spoken usage? Not written spoken?
    – Brad
    Jun 18, 2021 at 23:29
  • @FumbleFingers Re Thrice, agreed. but If you look on the net there are several publications that state that during informal speech two times is commonly used One question How does NGrams gather it's data for spoken usage? Not written spoken? My next comment is not directed at you personally; Now I do tend to reference my answers yet I often receive comments as if they are my words that are wrong whereas in fact I am quoting sources. I have received 3 comment in the last few hours where I have been told I am wrong when the item being refuted is a source that has been referenced? V/Ded?
    – Brad
    Jun 18, 2021 at 23:47

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