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When I was learning English my teacher told me every single word belong to a part of speech.

but I don't understand

There is a car in front of my house.

In this sentence, in front of is a preposition.

It's not a single word. It is a phrase.

so, can anyone explain to which parts of speech each word of in front of belongs?

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  • When words are combined in a set phrase such as in front of, the phrase may have a meaning regardless of the meanings of the individual words in it. As you say, the combination in front of is a preposition. Commented Jun 20, 2021 at 7:37

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You can consider the phrase "in front of" to be a compound word.

Compound nouns are quite common: "car park" is a compound noun. They formed by joining some words (in this case nouns) together. Originally a "car park" was a park (=a public open space) for cars. But the words have grown together, and now "car park" acts like a single word with its own specific meaning.

Similarly the phrase "in front of" must have developed out of the combination "in (preposition) front (noun) of (preposition)". But the words have grown together, and the phrase "in front of" now acts like a single word with a specific meaning, and one that functions like a preposition.

So each word has a part of speech, but "in front of" is one word, from a certain point of view.

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