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I have an adequate vehicle for your needs' to mean a vehicle one can rent that satisfy their needs?

regarding the use of the adjective in that order: 'adequate vehicle', is that correct for this context?

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  • Which is your question: "available vehicle" or "adequate vehicle"?
    – wetcircuit
    Jun 21 at 23:23
  • I've written an answer, but can you explain why you have a doubt about the word adequate here.
    – James K
    Jun 22 at 4:02
  • @JamesK sure, my doubt is regarding adjective use order, whether it shold be: 'I have an adequate vehicle for your needs' OR 'I have an vehicle adequate for your needs'
    – user138622
    Jun 22 at 11:11
  • In my opinion a vehicle [which is] adequate for your needs would be better, but your version would be acceptable. Sep 11 at 18:13
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"Adequate" has its usual dictionary meaning here. It tends to suggest that it only satisfies their needs. It doesn't satisfy their desires. The vehicle is okay, it's not good.

The attributive adjective goes in front of the noun like this in nearly all cases in English.

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  • so is it wrong to use the adjective before the noun?
    – user138622
    Jun 22 at 11:13
  • The attributive adjective goes in front of the noun
    – James K
    Jun 22 at 15:01
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It sounds like you might want to say "a suitable vehicle" if it fits all their needs

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