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I'd like to know if these two phrases "after a long time" and "after a long interval", which I often find in Japanese-English dictionaries, are used a lot.

I don't want to specify how much time has passed since I did something. So instead of saying

It's been a long time since I had sushi.
or
It's been a while since I saw my high school teacher last time.

is it possible to say

I had sushi after a long time / after a long interval.
or
I saw my high school teacher after a long time / after a long interval.

I haven't seen these expressions a lot except for Japanese-English dictionaries. My question is if these phrases are commonly used in the way I wrote above.

Also I have one more question: if I say, "I had sushi for the first time in a long time" does it sound natural?

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    You might consider, "I hadn't had sushi for a long time" or "I hadn't seen my high school teacher for a long time." Both of which imply that after some long period of time, you did finally do each of those things again.
    – Jim
    Jul 12 '14 at 5:19
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It's not common to use "after a long interval" to mean "after a long time." Your sentence "I had sushi for the first time in a long time" sounds perfectly natural.

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After a long time is used commonly. I have seen people posting on Facebook and other social sites as "visited my home after long back" OR "Enjoying at xyz location after long back" which i think totally illogical and meaningless.

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