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While reading, I get stuck by these two sentences:

Even if the code hasn't changed, the system behavior can because the data we use to train our models determines the predictions we make.

Chinese economic principles are not those of laissez-faire, nor of promoting the class struggle.

For the first one, if I am not wrong, "even if" is a subordinating conjunction, and then the main clause "the system behavior can" has two dependent clauses: "even if the code hasn't changed" and "because the data we use to train our models determines the predictions we make".

For the second one, I thought "nor" is a coordinating conjunction, and then the sentence is a simple sentence. Am I right?

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In the first example, because is also a subordinator. The main clause is then
the system behavior can [change],
where the last word's meaning is implied.
So you have a main clause and a subordinate clause even if....
Then you have final subordinate clause because..., which is subordinate to the combination of the first two clauses.

For the second example, I agree, it's simple. The sentence is like

The principles are neither A nor B.

The coordination lacks parallelism. That could be corrected by inserting another those and deleting promoting:

Chinese economic principles are not those of laissez-faire, nor those of the class struggle.

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