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It is said that 'some' classifies as an adjective of number and it is also used as a determiner. 1- When 'some' is used as an adjective in a sentence, how do we check whether it's being used as an adjective or a Determiner? Is it that adjective of number can be considered to be a category of determiner? 2- While defining order of adjectives when more than one adjective is used before a noun, where would 'some' fit in the order of adjectives before a noun? e.g some aromatic coffee beans- is this example right? If yes, then what 'some' indicates here? determiner or adjective of number?

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  • As a simple native speaker, I don't know about 'determiner' or 'adjective of number'! But I can tell you that 'some aromatic coffee beans' is right and refers to a quantity of aromatic coffee beans. 'aromatic some coffee beans' makes no sense.
    – Aidan
    Jun 25, 2021 at 10:00
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    Such 'rules' are not used by native speakers, and they are more like 'generalisations' anyway. The sentence "some aromatic coffee beans" you give is clear to a native speaker because some aromatic makes no sense. But "more aromatic coffee beans" is ambiguous. When spoken, the meaning could be determined from the intonation, but when written is it more aromatic, or more beans? Either way, the construction is grammatical, yet needs to be rephrased for clarity. Jun 25, 2021 at 10:36
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    It's never an adjective. You're conflating word category (part of speech) and function. In an example like "They invited some friends over", it belongs to the category determinative and its function is determiner. But in, for example, "They had invited some thirty guests" ("approximately"), it's an adverb functioning as a modifier.
    – BillJ
    Jun 25, 2021 at 12:43

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