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I grant you with great pleasure the forgiveness you asked for.

Is the position of with great pleasure grammatically correct?

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    I would have put it first or, less desirably, last.
    – mdewey
    Jul 4 '21 at 16:15
  • You should think of with great pleasure as a "sentence adverb" element, since it really applies to the entire statement I grant you the forgiveness you asked for, rather than simply being an adverbial modifier of the verb to grant. Sentence adverbs normally come either before or after the relevant text being modified, not within it. And as @mdewey says, in this exact context, it's "better" (more idiomatic) to put it at the front. Jul 4 '21 at 16:27
  • In older usage, that would be considered formal, grammatically correct, English. However, it is somewhat archaic usage, and might appear in a work from the early 19th century, or in modern "historic" or "gothic" literature. Jul 4 '21 at 20:38
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    Of course, if you wanted to really emphasise it or use it as an aside, you could use it as you have it but between commas: I grant you, with great pleasure, the forgiveness you asked for.
    – fev
    Jul 4 '21 at 21:07
  • Yes. It's correct.
    – gotube
    Jul 5 '21 at 5:12
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The sentence

I grant you, with great pleasure, the forgiveness you asked for.

is perfectly correct. It is however, a form now less common than

  • With great pleasure I grant you the forgiveness you asked for.
  • I grant you the forgiveness you asked for with great pleasure.

The choice is purely one of style, ther is no difference in meaning.

Technically "with great pleasure" is an adverbial phrase modifying the verb "grant" but in effect it emphasizes the entire sentence.

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  • In your final example you've introduced ambiguity. Did the requester ask for forgiveness with great pleasure, or was the forgiveness granted with great pleasure? This sort of ambiguity often ends up being unintentionally funny when not outright confusing. Think "This headstone was erected to the memory of John Smith who was killed tragically in a boating accident by a few of his affectionate friends." The original version avoids that ambiguity.
    – fred2
    Jul 26 '21 at 19:08
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An even more formal way of saying it would be:

It is with great pleasure that I grant you the forgiveness you asked for

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  • If you want to be formal, better to go the whole hog and say: "It it with great pleasure that I grant you the forgiveness for which you asked".
    – fred2
    Jul 26 '21 at 19:03
  • Or, more succinctly, 'It is with great pleasure that I grant you the forgiveness you asked.'
    – fred2
    Jul 26 '21 at 19:11

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