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Can I use lead to in my sentence?

"Which side do the windows of our new house lead to?"

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    Only use "lead to" if you're using them to get in and out of the house. Otherwise, you'd probably say which way they face. Jul 5, 2021 at 6:32
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    To add to what Old Brixtonian said, this sounds like there's windows on only one side of the new house. That's a strange kind of house. Is that what you meant?
    – gotube
    Jul 5, 2021 at 6:36
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    No, you can't say they "lead to the north", because windows by themselves, don't lead anywhere. They face a direction. Jul 5, 2021 at 13:50
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    They don't face a side of the house, they're just on a side of the house. Like "This window is on the north side of the house" or "this window faces north".
    – stangdon
    Jul 5, 2021 at 14:52
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    As @stangdon said, it's "this window faces north". North is not a specific, unique thing -- it's a general direction, and because a window doesn't lead anywhere, you don't need the. Compare this to a trail, or a road -- "the road leads north". You follow a road; you can't follow a window. Jul 5, 2021 at 17:48

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The word "lead" in the sense used in the question, indicates a direction that can be *followed It is often used when giving directions, or describing a route that one can take.

  • All roads lead to Rome.
  • The hall heads to the kitchen
  • Route 86a leads to Germantown.
  • The back door leads to the ally.

It is much more naturally used of a door than of a window, unless the window is being used or considered as a route of passage, as in:

The window leads only to a 50-story drop.

To describe the position of a window in a house or other building, one can use "faces", "looks out on" or "is in the X side". For example:

  • The window faces North
  • The window faces the street.
  • The upper window looks out on the side lawn.
  • The now window is in the West side of the house.

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