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  1. Now move on to the next part if you succeed in practicing Part 1.
  2. Now move on to the next part if you have succeeded in practicing Part 1.
  3. Now move on to the next part if you succeeded in practicing Part 1.
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  • 2
    I think all of those would be valid (2. in British English, 3. in American) - but can you succeed in practising something? Surely practice is an ongoing process. Jul 6 at 7:37
  • 2
    I agree, @KateBunting - it should be something more like "if you have succeeded in completing Part 1" (or "once you have completed Part 1 successfully") or "after you have finished practising Part 1". (For BrE, "practising" is the preferred spelling.)
    – rjpond
    Jul 6 at 8:56
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None of these is wrong. Choice 1 puts the reader's PoV before the start of the test, while choices 2 and 3 put it after the reader is done with part 1.

I agree with comments that "succeed in practicing Part 1." is awkward, in any tense. One may "finish" or "complete a part, or "succeed in it" or "successfully complete" it, leaving a wide range of possible combinations: including:

  • Now move on to the next part if you finish part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part after you finish part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part if you finish part 1 successfully.
  • Now move on to the next part if you complete part 1 successfully.
  • Now move on to the next part if you succeed in part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part if you have finished part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part after you have finished part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part if you have finished part 1 successfully.
  • Now move on to the next part if you have completed part 1 successfully.
  • Now move on to the next part if you have succeeded in part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part if you finished part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part if you finished part 1 successfully.
  • Now move on to the next part if you completed part 1 successfully.
  • Now move on to the next part if you succeeded in part 1.
  • Now move on to the next part if you succeeded in completing part 1.

There are shades of meaning here, particularly in what is suggested if the reader does not complete part 1, or does not do so successfully. The forms using "after" imply that all will complete part 1, while the forms using "if" suggest that some may not, and those people should not move on.

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