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I am currently learning english for my CAE exam. I stumbled across this sentence:

As soon as I have had a look at the designs, I will send them to you.

Why is it have had in this case and not just had? I thought present perfect is used for recent indefinite actions or habits but none of those apply here.

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    Does this sound alright to you? "As soon as I had a look..." when talking about the future?
    – Cascabel
    Jul 7 at 21:40
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    Perhaps you're being throw off because of the phrasal verb have a look. If you replace it with look does it seem simpler? Compare "As soon as I have looked at the designs, I will send them" and "As soon as I looked at the designs, I will send them"
    – Juhasz
    Jul 7 at 23:46
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"As soon as I had a look..." would imply you're describing something that happened in the past, ie, "As soon as I had a look, I sent them the designs."

Since the action you describe will take place in the future, but is already completed by the time you are sending the designs, that is, you have had a look, you use the present perfect.

If you add the word 'after' in the sentence...

"After I have had a look at the designs, I will send them to you."

...this distinction becomes clearer. In this case you could also omit "have had" altogether and the meaning would stay the same.

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  • thank you buddy
    – Fab
    Jul 9 at 10:54
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The present perfect form is used here to stress the 'finishedness' of the action.

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