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Have I used the second "it" correctly? I mean to say that vapour rises and flows in to a current of cold air, so it condenses.

Vapour becomes colder, and moisture condenses out of it as it rises and flows into a current of cold air.

I am asking this question because I guess there could be a kind of ambiguity about what it really refers to. We can read the sentence two way:

  1. Vapour becomes colder
  2. and moisture condenses out of it as it rises and flows into a current of cold air.

If we read it this way, we can say that it refers to "moisture". The other way we can read is this way:

  1. Vapour becomes colder, and moisture condenses out of it
  2. as it rises and flows into a current of cold air.

This way, it refers to the subject of the last clause Vapour

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    Yes, the sentence is correct and understandable.
    – randomhead
    Jul 9 at 14:42
  • I wouldn't really say "the second it refers to the first it". They just both refer to the same thing.
    – stangdon
    Jul 9 at 16:06
  • Funny closing reason; I believe this question clearly focuses on "something in particular" that the author is unsure about.
    – Davo
    Jul 13 at 11:52

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