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a. Tom didn't vote for Dan and neither did I. But Tom didn't vote for Dan for the wrong reasons.

(The reasons for which Tom didn't vote for Dan were not the right reasons.)


b. I didn't speak out against Harry and neither did you. But you didn't speak out against Harry for your own interests.

(It was in your interest not to speak out against Harry)


c. Tom didn't go to the meeting and neither did you. But you didn't go to the meeting for Tom.

(The reason you didn't go to the meeting was Tom. You didn't go to help him or to make him happy or...)

Are (a), (b) and (c) grammatically correct and meaningful?

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    [...] due to your own interests or because of your own interests. Not for.
    – Lambie
    Jul 9 at 22:04
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    The last one (c), you would add after the "or," "...because he asked you not to." You would say, "The reason you didn't go to the meeting was Tom." The rest isn't necessary, but if you're going to say it, then what you'd say is, "You didn't go in order to help him or make him happy or because he asked you not to." Jul 10 at 2:33
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    In my opinion, it would be better to say, for example "You failed to speak out against Harry..." - "You stayed away from the meeting...". Otherwise the sentences are ambiguous or, at least, confusing. "You didn't speak out against Harry [for] your own interests, but [for some other reason]." Jul 10 at 9:04
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    (c) could mean that "you" attended the meeting, but the purpose for attending was not "for Tom". More clear might be "But you didn't go to the meeting for reasons other than Tom."
    – jim
    Jul 12 at 12:59

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