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My mom has asked me quite often: What is the difference between “being” and “having been”? She still struggles with the difference between the two phrases. Although I’m aware of how they are different, I don’t know how to explain the difference. I believe I have attempted to explain it to her before, but she really struggles to understand because both “being” and “having been” sound the same to her phonetically. When my mom pronounces “being” and “been” out loud they sound exactly the same to me, but only when she pronounces it. I don’t think her Spanish accent when speaking English is that unique. She is probably not the only one having trouble with this.

I'm a native English speaker who was never taught English grammar in Elementary, Middle, or High School and I don't know where to begin researching for the answer. My mom is a native Spanish speaker. Please Help.

Edit:

Here are a couple of examples of how I understand the difference:

Example sentence for "having been": "...but you have been doing that for a while (or all this time)"

Example sentence for "being": "you are being (acting) nice right now."

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    I don't agree with you closing my question and I don't agree that it is off topic. As I have already stated "I'm a native English speaker who was never taught English grammar in Elementary, Middle, or High School and I don't know where to begin researching for the answer." I can't ask this question on another stack exchange because the other stack exchange is for those learning English as a second Language. Stack Exchange, you do not have a stack exchange group for Native English Speakers who were never taught grammar and need more help than usual. Stack Exchange, you need to change that.
    – Edna
    Jul 11 at 5:20
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    No; apologies for any misleading advice about 'ELL' you may have picked up. ELL is for more basic questions on the English language, with no discrimination against who is asking. Non-native speakers are just a typical group who might have questions at this level, but native speakers are equally welcome. // The word 'being' in particular, and the string 'having been', occur in various different usages. You need to add example sentences (Mary gives possibilities in her answer). But the present participle clause has been covered here ... Jul 11 at 13:50
  • before in great detail. Jul 11 at 13:52
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    Most of us aren't staff at SE - we're just members of the community. I've taken a look at the vote to close - it's actually a vote to migrate this question to ELL; don't worry about the wording of 'Close' in this case. Since the intended community for ELL includes 'ESL' teachers, your question should fit well there. You're seeking information / help to 'teach' your mum (who we can consider a language learner) an aspect of English. I'll also vote to migrate. And welcome to EL&U!
    – Lawrence
    Jul 12 at 1:31
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    @Lawrence Thank you.
    – Edna
    Jul 12 at 3:02
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"Being" is the present participle. It refers something happening at the same time as the main action:

Being a good student, I learned a lot in school.

Being knowledgeable about the matter, I can tell you the answer.

In both cases, both parts happen at the same time.

"Having been" uses the past participle "been". It refers to something in the past compared to the main action

Having been a good student, I did not find the final difficult.

Having been a good student, I can answer your question.

My being a good student preceded both the final and the ability to answer.

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    "Having been" is not a past participle. "Been" is the past participle of the verb "be".
    – JK2
    Jul 11 at 3:56
  • Thank you @Mary for caring enough to answer my question. I greatly appreciate it.
    – Edna
    Jul 11 at 5:23
  • Thank you @JK2 also for caring enough to answer my question. I greatly appreciate it.
    – Edna
    Jul 11 at 5:29
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In a few words:

• Being = now, generally, now+further.

• Having been = before (some main action).

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  • Thank you @Paul Qii for your answer. I greatly appreciate it.
    – Edna
    Jul 12 at 18:44

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