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  1. Brian was released without charge this evening after being detained by police for about ten hours.

  2. Brian was released without charge this evening, being detained by police for about ten hours.

  3. Being detained by police for about ten hours, Brian was released without charge this evening.

Do they mean the same thing?

4
  • Item 2 needs a comma, just like item 3.
    – EllieK
    Jul 12 at 12:43
  • 3
    I think #2 and #3 are invalid. Should be having been detained if you're not going to include after. Jul 12 at 13:18
  • @FF, Is it because the sequence of events is not clear?
    – Mr. X
    Jul 12 at 13:48
  • Even when corrected as @FumbleFingers noted above, they don't mean exactly the same thing. That's because the word order creates a different emphasis. #1 emphasizes that he was released with the detention being secondary; #2/#3 emphasize the detention, with #2 doing so most strongly. Jul 12 at 17:15

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