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I want to have fun and kiss her.

I want to have fun with and kiss her.

Can these two mean the same thing? Can you omit the "with" or you cannot do that in writing? Do you really need to clarify and use "with"?

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They mean different things.

I want to have fun and kiss her means "I want to have fun, and I will have fun by kissing her."

I want to have fun with and kiss her means "I want to have fun with her, and also I want to kiss her."

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  • Can't it also mean: I want to have fun (with) and kiss her.
    – Sayaman
    Jul 13 at 1:27
  • @Sayaman What do you think is the object of the preposition "with"?
    – gotube
    Jul 13 at 2:12
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Not to have it mean the same thing.

"I want to have fun and kiss her" = "I want to have fun, and I want to kiss her."

In that sentence, the phrase "kiss her" can only refer back to "want to." It can't refer back to anything else, like not "want to have" because "I want to have kiss her" makes no sense" and not "want to have fun" because "I want to have fun kiss her" makes no sense.

"I want to have fun with and kiss her."

The above sentence doesn't really work, either. You're making a list of two things you "want to" do. Each item in the list refers back to "want to." Those two items are "have fun with (her)" and "kiss her." Grammatically, it becomes incomprehensibly convoluted when each of the two items in the list refers back to "want to" and then internally within the first item you refer forward to something in the second item as the object of the preposition "with" in the first item refers forward to a the direct object of the verb "kiss" in the second item, "her." You're all over the place, so much so that it doesn't make sense, which isn't to say that someone can't dissect it and work out what you mean, like I have, but it's not readily understandable and isn't how people talk.

What you'd say is:

"I want to have fun with her and kiss her."

Now, the verb "go" is a a different story because the phrase "go with" is readily understood as implying whoever is going, meaning one could say, "I want to go with and kiss her," but it wouldn't necessarily mean "go with her" but simply "go with whoever is going," so it would only ever be construed as "go with her" if she happens to be the only one going and people already know that. "Fun with" isn't a readily understood phrase like "go with" is, isn't a phrase where the object of the preposition can be left implied, like one can simply say as a sentence, "I'll go with," but one cannot simply say as a sentence, "I'll have fun with."

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