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According to Cambridge dictionary 'loose end' means 'something that still needs to be done or explained.' I was chatting with Facebook support about a problem with my account and when the person asked if I need help with anything else, I said "Hold on a sec. I want to send you a screenshot of the problem. I don't want any loose ends this time."

I said that because I talked with them about the same issue twice before. And this time I wanted to make sure that I let them know about the problem in as much detail as possible. So I thought the idiom would fit here even though I wasn't sure if it would.

Also while looking it up I came across 'tie up loose ends.' Say I'm doing a project and someone asks whether it's complete. Can I say "Almost. I just need to tie up some loose ends and I'll be done."

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    You are using the idiom correctly in both cases. Jul 16, 2021 at 18:44
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    If you add the word leave to your first sentence it becomes a little more elegant and you imply any fault was your own: I don't want to leave any loose ends this time. Jul 16, 2021 at 21:07

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I don't want any loose ends this time."

It is not clear from the context what you mean. It is a little ambiguous as to who caused the loose ends.

If you had written earlier and the other party had not done all that you required, then the "loose ends" are the things (usually small but necessary details or minor tasks) that he did not do. You are saying that he has to do these things. This is the commonest use.

If you had written earlier and had omitted some requirements, then the "loose ends" are the things that you omitted. This use is not common. You would accept responsibility and say "some things that I forgot."

Can I say "Almost. I just need to tie up some loose ends and I'll be done."

Yes, this is a good use: loose ends - small but, necessary, details or minor tasks

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  • Thank you for the answer. I think saying "I don't want to LEAVE any loose ends this time" makes it a good sentence since I'm admitting that the mistake was on my end. Correct me if I'm wrong, I think the way I said it originally makes it sound bossy. As if I'm ordering him to fix my account.
    – Ashraf
    Jul 20, 2021 at 17:22
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    I think saying "I don't want to LEAVE any loose ends this time" makes it a good sentence.* Yes. Exactly!
    – user81561
    Jul 20, 2021 at 17:38

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