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I'm having difficulty in finding the correct combination of words for the following question phrase that would sound natural for English native speakers:

"What is the most worth-to-wait thing in the whole world?"

OR a another version that is roughly the same in meaning is:

"What is the number one that is most worth the wait in this whole world?"

I would prefer if answers could avoid using the word "thing" in the question phrase, as the answer to this question phrase is supposedly a "who" and not an object.

I am considering

"Out of all [things] that's worth the wait, what is the number one, the most worth waiting for in the whole world?".

Would this be the more natural way a native English speaker would say it?

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    "What [thing] in the whole world is the most worth waiting for?" Commented Jul 18, 2021 at 13:25
  • What about "Who in this world is the most worth waiting for?"..?
    – Tomsofty33
    Commented Jul 18, 2021 at 13:53
  • I don't understand -- you're ranking people to wait for? What are you waiting for them to do -- be born? Is this like a baby lottery or something? Commented Jul 18, 2021 at 14:25
  • Its asking about a religious thing, you won't understand it. I'm not trying to argue about the actual answer of the question here. I only need to find the proper english way to ask it. The answer is G-d btw if you're curious. But please don't discuss about the answer for that particular question here. It would be prolonging unnecessary discussion.
    – Tomsofty33
    Commented Jul 18, 2021 at 14:44
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    @Tomsofty33 I am a pretty spiritual guy. Anyhow I respect your wishes. I’m still not sure that the question makes sense in English. When we wait for people, we are waiting for them to do something or to be something. So you may want to restate your question. Commented Jul 18, 2021 at 20:06

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If you don't know what a given "thing" is, and you don't want to use the word "thing", an option is to use the "null noun" or "noun"-ify the modifier like this:

What is most worth waiting for in the whole world?

Who always refers to possible subjects that can be considered a person, and what always refers to possible subjects that are not considered people. If the possible subject could be either a thing or a person, you can do this:

Who or what is most worth waiting for in the whole world?

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  • Hi, thank you for the answer. It seems this answer is the correct one. Since its related, I have another question, would it sound natural to say "the most worthy of being waited for" or is it better to call it "the most worth waiting for"? Are both correct ways of saying it?
    – Tomsofty33
    Commented Jul 20, 2021 at 13:12
  • The most worthy of being waited for is technically correct but to me seems a bit over-wordy and an unnecessary use of the passive voice.
    – LawrenceC
    Commented Jul 20, 2021 at 14:19

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