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Could you please explain what the semantic difference is between two sentences? Are they both idiomatic?

There is a fox running along the road.

A fox is running along the road.

Or we have to use "there is" when when we talk about something for the first time. And it works all the time! For example, "There is a man running along the road." But, "He is running along the road.", because we know that person in some way, so we don't need to use "there is". But this fox we can't know (if we aren't workers of the zoo and the fox has ran away from the zoo) and "there is" is always necessary when we see a new animal or person. Right?

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A fox is running along the road.

is simply stating a fact. This sentence is neutral and can be used to describe something for the first time.

We use "there is" when when you talk about something for the first time, but that is when we point out to their existence or presence:

We use there is and there are when we first refer to the existence or presence of someone or something:

  • There’s a letter on your desk. Julia brought it from the mail room. (Cambridge)

Your sentence,

There is a fox running along the road.

is more emphatic than the first one, and it points not only to the existence of the fox but also to the action it is performing. There is draws more attention to the mere fact and may also express surprise in certain contexts.

2

Like the previous response mentions, if you are surprised by the fact that there's a fox running along the road, it would be more suitable to say "there is a fox ...". In contrast, saying "a fox is" is a more factual statement of what is happening that you might find in a book.

  • Come here, there's a fox in the road!
  • Snow is falling, and there's a crispness to the air. The clouds are breaking. A fox runs across the road.

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