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I would like to ask the difference between the usage of future perfect tense with present tense and the future prefect tense with future tense.

We will have eaten food when they come.
We will have eaten food when they will come.

Which one is correct? The second sentence describes which situation?

Or both have problems?

Does it make sense to say : “We will have eaten before they will arrive”?

We will have eaten by the time they arrive. In this case, "they arrive" is it an assumption situation as "they arrive" is not yet happened?

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    Your second version is syntactically invalid. The first one is "valid", but relatively "unlikely / awkward" for native speakers. We'd be more likely to say, for example, We will have eaten by the time they arrive. There's rarely any reason to specify food after eat, and when is more natural for "simultaneous" events, rather than indicating that one thing occurred earlier than another. And arrive usually works better than come in such contexts. Jul 25 at 17:53
  • Thank you your explanations. Does it make sense to say : We will have eaten before they will arrive? We will have eaten by the time they arrive. In this case, "they arrive" is it an assumption situation as "they arrive" is not yet happen? Jul 25 at 18:22
  • We will have eaten before they arrive. The speaker presumably knows at what time the visitors are expected and is confident that the meal will be over by then. Jul 25 at 19:40
  • Thank you, I also want to know when I can use will arrive in the future perfect tense. The present tense there is like a factual thing, just like: The sun rises? Jul 25 at 19:49
  • If you're simply saying that something will happen in the future, you need to explicitly indicate the fact of it being in the future by including the highlighted modal auxiliary verb. But if the reference to that future event is dependent upon some context that''s already in the future, such as I will phone you when they arrive (where the highlighted element establishes a future context for the entire utterance), we don't normally keep repeating the modal form to indicate that "future" scope for the "subordinate" verb (arrive, there). Jul 26 at 11:06

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