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Let's say someone took someone's money or property promising them something in return, but they swindled them. What is the correct collocation to use with "swindle" if we want to say what the person who was swindled was promised? Can we say sentences like,

He was swindled with the promise of a new house.

They swndled him promising a car.

They swindled him with a promise of a new car.

They swindled her with the promise of making her a model.

They swindled her promising they would make her a model.

I feel these sentences might be wrong or unidiomatic. What do you think?

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In general I think you would say (in UK English)

He was swindled out of [X] by the promise of [Y]

Where X is the thing / money he lost and Y is the item / job that was not forthcoming.

Your examples are reasonably OK, for 3 of them I would suggest

They swindled him by promising a car.

They swindled him with the promise of a new car.

They swindled her by promising they would make her a model.

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  • Thanks. So you think "by the promise of" and "with the promise of" are interchangeable? Jul 26, 2021 at 15:22
  • No, they're not interchangeable. "By the promise of" doesn't mean anything in this context and is wrong
    – gotube
    Jul 27, 2021 at 6:32
  • @PeterShor Oops typo! two words transposed. Thanks for spotting it, now corrected. Aug 15 at 23:08

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