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TheFreedictionary.com says that the word "row" can mean: 3. A line of adjacent seats, as in a theater, auditorium, or classroom. or a. (chiefly Brit) a street, esp a narrow one lined with identical houses

which one is it in this context? (if any)

‘His wife a year he fondly loved
His wife a—a year he—fondly loved.’ 
Or suddenly waking up again:
‘Walking along the crowded row
He met the one he used to know.’

It is a translation of Russian, from Crime and Punishment, chapter 1. The original is "По Подьяческой пошел, // Свою прежнюю нашел."

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    Without knowing the source of the quote - apparently a poem - one can't be sure, but it seems likely that it's the 'street' meaning. Jul 30, 2021 at 16:45
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    Worse than that, its a translation of Russian Poetry Crime and Punishment. The original is "По Подьяческой пошел, // Свою прежнюю нашел." Подьяческой seems to be the name of a narrow road in St Petersburg. Perhaps it is famous for something in Russia.
    – James K
    Jul 30, 2021 at 17:07
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    In future please make sure that you clearly identify the source of any quote.
    – James K
    Jul 30, 2021 at 20:08

2 Answers 2

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It’s a very old word for narrow street/road. Some streets in the UK are still called ‘row’ though not many. For most English people it would sound very Dickensian.

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    There's some of those in the US as well, not sure if it's any more or less common. Feb 2, 2022 at 18:16
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It probably means "narrow street".

The original is from Crime and Punishment, and a drunk man is singing drunkenly. "По Подьяческой пошел": literally something like "To Pod'yacheskoy, begone!". "Pod'yacheskoy" is a narrow street in central St Petersburg. Perhaps this is a fragment of a Russian bawdy song.

However the English suggests walking along a narrow but crowded street. A free interpretation in order to find a convenient rhyme.

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  • Thank you for your answers :) Jul 30, 2021 at 19:06

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