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When you don't want to use the verb "translate" because you feel it is exaggerated in your context. I just wonder if "make it in English" works. What would you say alternatively?

I'm not sure if these English words, both of which I roughly made in English, are correct.

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  • What is the context. Translate means to convert from one language to another. It isn't an exaggerated word. If you mean take text in one language and re-make it in English, the you need to use "translate" So.... Please give the context as an example sentence You can edit the example sentence into your question.
    – James K
    Jul 31 at 18:51
  • For example, "I'm not sure if these English words, both of which I roughly translated, are correct."
    – Yamato
    Jul 31 at 23:31
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    So you are asking if you can say something like "I'm not sure if these English words, both of which I roughly made in English, are correct." That is a good example and I'll add it too the question. In future remember you can edit your question instead of adding extra information in the comments.
    – James K
    Aug 1 at 0:44
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Translate is always going to be correct: it means

to turn into one's own or another language (Merriam-Webster)

It isn't exaggerated, but possible alternatives if talking to somebody else might be

What does that mean in English?
How do you say that in English?
What's that in English?

In other situations, although I suspect this might be regional and context dependent (so I wouldn't advise using it, but for the sake of completeness) I sometimes use "put" or even "go". I would never write this though (except here to explain how I'd say it!).

These leaflets need to be put into German, French and Spanish before the deadline.
Sandrine, could you put this paragraph into French for me please?

These leaflets need to go into German, French and Spanish before the deadline.

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  • Yes, I thought it might be quite formal, but I guess there's no good alternatives.
    – Yamato
    Jul 31 at 23:34
  • It might seem formal, but it isn't really very formal. It is just the normal word.
    – James K
    Aug 1 at 0:45
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    @JamesK, it does sound completely normal, I just wasn't sure if I'd necessarily say it in a 'chat'! I'll alter my answer so I don't put people off using it. Aug 1 at 0:53
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Say it in English. "Make it..." doesn't work.
Alternatively, "express" it.

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  • Indeed. Thank you for the helpful information. I don't need to use "Make it".
    – Yamato
    Jul 31 at 23:32

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