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Yesterday, when we were returning from the party,(a)/ our car met with an accident,(b)/ but we were fortunate to reach our home safely.(c)/ No error (d)

The answer is (d), but according to me it should be (c). I think in such cases we usually use “fortunate enough”. Is it correct to use “fortunate”? Also can someone explain the difference between the two phases "fortunate" and "fortunate enough"?

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    The sentence in question is a strange one. Cars don't meet with accidents; people do. And the but is awkward. More likely is: Yesterday, when we were returning from the party, WE met with an accident AND (we) were fortunate to reach (our) home safely. Fortunate enough means sufficiently fortunate. It is used in certain contexts to signify lucky enough - to have sufficient good fortune to secure the outcome. You might say lucky to win a million on the lottery. But lucky enough to find a petrol station when the tank was low. Aug 2 at 13:38
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    Yes, it should be either and we were fortunate to (meaning 'we very nearly didn't) OR but we were fortunate enough to (meaning 'despite the accident, we did get home'). Aug 2 at 14:03
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Here's how I'd write this sentence:

Yesterday when we were returning from the party, we almost got into an accident, but we were fortunate enough to make it home safely.

The phrase "our car encountered an accident" is strange, and without more context I can't try and paraphrase it, but as Ronald said, cars don't really meet with accidents.

As Kate pointed out, "fortunate enough" implies that "even though there was an accident, we made it home", whereas "fortunate" alone simply means more like "lucky", which implies that there was uncertainty.

"Fortunate enough" is used more commonly in general I'd say.

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    It's very good. Change "in" to "into" Aug 3 at 14:06
  • Thanks, updated. That is indeed better, though english speakers are often too lazy to use the more correct one (or at least that's my understanding)
    – Riolku
    Aug 3 at 20:48

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