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As far as I know, the phrase "direct result" should be used in English for some actions.

For example:

"The economic recession was a direct result of the government's implementation of that detrimental policy."

"This discovery was a direct result of their research."

Both 'implementation' and 'research' imply some kind of actions.

However, it wouldn't sound right if I applied 'direct result' for a non-action noun:

"His ability to locate that place so fast was a direct result of the map that he had with him."

Here I have a similar problem. I have a sentence listing some personal qualities of some individual and stating that individual's success based on those qualities:

"His success was a direct result of such individual qualities like self-confidence, persistence and amazing speaking skills."

I want to keep the phrase "a direct result" in it, but I don't know which action-noun to use. I was thinking about 'utilization':

"His success was a direct result of utilization of such individual qualities like self-confidence, persistence and amazing speaking skills.

but I think it sounds too technical.

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  • Why do you think "His success was a direct result of individual qualities like self-confidence, persistence and amazing speaking skills"? Though "a direct result of such individual qualities as" would also be ok.
    – user3169
    Aug 7, 2021 at 2:53
  • @user3169 - "Why do you think" - I don't know. I am not a native English speaker, so I don't really know. If what you have suggested sounds okay in English than I am more than happy. It's just that somebody told me before that 'direct result' can also be of actions or a process. I might have been mislead by that. So, the phrase 'direct result' then can also work fine with non-action nouns ('self-confidence', 'persistence' and 'skills')?
    – brilliant
    Aug 7, 2021 at 4:06

1 Answer 1

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First, like should be replaced by as:

His success was a direct result of such individual qualities as self-confidence, persistence and amazing speaking skills.

This is a modified word order of the phrase such as.

It would be more economical to say

His success was due to his self-confidence, persistence, and speaking skills.

If you insist on the longer structure, instead of utilization of, you might consider use of or application of.

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  • Thank you. Do you think using the phrase 'direct result of' without any action noun would also work (it was suggested by @user3169 in the comment above: "His success was a direct result of such individual qualities as self-confidence, persistence and amazing speaking skills")?
    – brilliant
    Aug 8, 2021 at 5:56
  • Yes, that was the phrasing in my answer. Aug 8, 2021 at 17:03

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