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Consider the following sentence:
I have done my maths homework too.
The sentence above can be used when I did my homework in addition to some other thing. For example,
I have cleaned the house. I have done my maths homework too.
However, it can also be used as a reply when your classmate tells you that he's done his maths homework. You reply:
"I have done my maths homework too."

Another example:
I had eggs too.
The sentence again has the same problem as the sentence in the first example. It can be used when the speaker has had eggs in addition to some other food item, and also as a reply to someone telling the speaker that he has had eggs.

Yet another example:
I'm from South Africa too.
You can use the sentence above when you want to tell somebody who just told you that he/she is from South Africa. You can also use the sentence if you have a dual citizenship and you belong to more than one country:
I'm from the US. I'm from South Africa too.

Is it normal and correct to use "too" immediately after the subject as that would solve the problem in the above examples? Each of the sentences below can have only one meaning unlike the sentences in the examples above.
I too did my maths homework.
I too had eggs.
I too am from South Africa.

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  • Correct. Using "too" immediately after the thing that is "also" makes the meaning unambiguous.
    – gotube
    Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 3:48
  • It is correct, but unfortunately not normal. Often you have to work it out from context.
    – Peter
    Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 4:54
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    It's perfectly correct to begin a sentence with "I, too...", but only a pedant would do so in everyday conversation. Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 6:31
  • @Peter so whenever I have to use "too" to mean "in addition" or "also" I have to use it at the end of the sentence?
    – adieng
    Commented Aug 10, 2021 at 14:52
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    "Too" usually goes at the end of the sentence in that situation, yes. You could use it as you suggested (I too did that), but is quite unusual.
    – Peter
    Commented Aug 11, 2021 at 4:04

1 Answer 1

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Is it normal and correct to use "too" immediately after the subject as that would solve the problem in the above examples?

It is correct, but not normal. In everyday usage, "too" goes at the end. The differences in meaning which you mentioned are usually solved by understanding the overall context of the situation. Placing "too" immediately after the subject sounds old-fashioned, or non-standard, from the perspective of US English.

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  • Thank you so much for your answer. Does this mean that whenever I have to use "too" as "in addition" and "also" I can always use it at the end of the sentence and never be wrong? Please pardon me if you find my questions silly, but I'm just a beginner.
    – adieng
    Commented Aug 13, 2021 at 3:05
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    It is difficult to assure someone they will never be wrong. In the few cases where "also" or "too" cause ambiguity, you may have to add more context to what you say, or rearrange the sentence.
    – Sam
    Commented Aug 13, 2021 at 11:09

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