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I think the following sentences have similar meanings.

He is intelligent enough to solve this question.

He is so intelligent as to solve this question.

On the other hand, do the following sentences have similar meanings? (In the first place, are the second and third sentences grammatically correct?)

This question is easy enough for children to solve.

This question is so easy for children as to solve.

This question is so easy as for children to solve.

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There is the expression "so as to", which implies intention. For example, "he posted the question online so as to learn the answer". That wouldn't make sense with your examples because they aren't about doing something with an intention.

Sentences constructed like yours, using "so [x] as to [y]" connect a result with a cause. For example, "the storm was so strong as to cause damage". This does not fit your examples either, as they are not showing a result and a cause.

He is intelligent enough to solve this question.

This means that 'he' has sufficient intelligence to solve the equation - it doesn't mean that he will solve it, or that he even intends to try.

This question is easy enough for children to solve.

This means that the question could be solved by children, not that they have or they will.

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  • Then, is this sentence correct? ”He was so intelligent as to solve this question.” That he was intelligent is a cause and that he solved this question is a result.
    – Aya
    Aug 22 '21 at 11:35
  • I can't understand your answer. In ”He is so intelligent as to solve this question.”, that he is intelligent is a cause and that he solves this question is a result.
    – Aya
    Aug 22 '21 at 11:45
  • @Aya That doesn't make sense... how do you cause intelligence?
    – Astralbee
    Aug 22 '21 at 13:28
  • I said intelligence is a cause, not a result. I mean intelligence causes him to solve this question.
    – Aya
    Aug 22 '21 at 14:08
  • For example, the following sentence is correct, isn't it? ”She was so kind as to show me the way to the station.”
    – Aya
    Aug 22 '21 at 14:12

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