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Example:

You said you couldn't run. How did you make it this far then?

You said you couldn't run. How have you made it this far then?

Is there any difference between the two? Or they mean the same thing?

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Their meaning is near identical. There is a slight shade of emphasis because of the verb tense, though. "How did you make it this far" puts the emphasis on what might have happened to get you here—it asks you to explain your past. "How have you made it this far" puts the emphasis on your current situation—it asks you to explain your present.

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  • I think "how did you" makes it sound as if the action has ended? And "how have you" makes it sound as if the action continues?
    – alexchenco
    Aug 26 '21 at 13:53
  • Hm, I'm not sure I would say that either one either implies or denies that the action is continuing. One is basically "you made" (that is, "you did make"). Plain old past tense. The other is "You have made," which is present perfect tense: "We use the present perfect tense when we want to connect the present with the (recent) past in some way": bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/… Aug 26 '21 at 14:07
  • @alexchenco If it's important to imply ongoing action, you can use a present participle: "How are you making it this far?" Aug 26 '21 at 14:09

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