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Is it correct to say "I had been X (profession) for some time" when now I am not working as X?

Example:

I had been karting driver for 7 years

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    In general, yes, but I have no idea what you mean by karting driver. And and a would most likely come before the X (profession): I had been a banker for 7 years before I became a dentist. OR I was a banker for 7 years, but now I am a dentist. – user6951 Jul 20 '14 at 23:23
  • Maybe its a go-kart or go-cart driver. – user3169 Jul 21 '14 at 0:36
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    I think its OK, though you need an article (a/an/the) before the profession. – user3169 Jul 21 '14 at 0:37
  • Thank you for the info about article, it is needed here. Karting is a kind of motor sport where small car called "kart" is used: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kart_racing – Richard Topchii Jul 21 '14 at 1:02
  • I have a feeling that using "had been" would occur in close proximity to another clause that says states what you're doing at the moment. "I'm a dentist now. I had been a banker for five years." "I had been a paediatrician for six years, then I became a speech pathologist." – jimsug Jul 21 '14 at 4:41
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It does not sound ok to me (non native).

I think It should be either:

I had been a kart driver for 7 years

I had been driving karts for 7 years

(or "I have been..." depending on the temporal context)

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you! Seems, that "I had been a kart driver for 7 years" is perfectly correct, as it sounds really nice and I think the tense is also correct. Thanx for an article. Then only question has left that is it possible to say "karting driver" instead of "kart driver"? As karting is sport, it is the same as "racing driver". Is "racing driver" correct? Thank you. – Richard Topchii Jul 23 '14 at 23:16
  • "To race" is a verb. So you can have "racing". I am not aware of the existence of the verb "To kart". But being you in the field, maybe you can tell. If you instead use the legitimate noun "go-karting", perhaps you might form the term "go-karting driver", but I am a non native speaker (foreigner), so a native should confirm that. I don't really know. – Pam Jul 24 '14 at 0:34
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    Also, seems that in US and Western world the sport is called "go-karting", while in Russia and CIS its called "karting". Thank you for clarification. – Richard Topchii Jul 24 '14 at 1:17

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