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Let's say we (me and my daughter) have just got home, we go to the bathroom and I say to her (a 5 years old child) to wash her hands, and I think that in the meantime I could change my clothes.

What would you say as a English mother tongue in this situation?

Baby girl come on, wash your hands. While you are washing your hands I'll go to my bedroom and change my clothes

or

Baby girl come on, wash your hands. While you are washing your hands I'm going to my bedroom and change my clothes

or

Baby girl come on, wash your hands. While you are washing your hands I go to my bedroom and change my clothes

or

none of the above, I would say...


Note: I have already read all this Q&A and have come to the conclusion that there is no simple grammar rule. Hence I would like to know what an English/Ame mother tongue will say in this specific situation.

Present continuous with present simple using while:

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    The preceding while clause is irrelevant. The future in English is naturally expressed by I'm going..., I am going..., I'll go..., I will go... In some contexts (mostly literary / poetic) we can also use the Simple Present, as in I go to work tomorrow, but that's not idiomatic in your specific context. Aug 30, 2021 at 10:43

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A possible phrasing is:

Come on, go wash your hands. While you're washing your hands, I'll go get changed in the bedroom.

"Baby girl" would not be used but possibly the actual name would be.

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    NB That is a specifically American way to say it. Aug 30, 2021 at 20:15
  • @Kate Bunting what would you say? Sep 7, 2021 at 10:41
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    @MarcoDemaio - "Go and wash your hands." Sep 7, 2021 at 10:45

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