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If they don't hurry up they will miss the flight.

If they wouldn't hurry up they will miss the flight.

If they won't hurry up they will miss the flight.

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    Your second example is not valid English. The first one (which is far more likely to occur) equates to the relatively "neutral" statement "If for any reason they fail to hurry, they'll miss the flight". The last one means "If they [obstinately] refuse to hurry, they'll miss it". Jul 21 '14 at 12:59
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The first is the most common. It implies they must hurry up in the very near future to make the flight. The third implies an act of volition or will; they must choose a faster pace of events or they will miss the flight.

I have never seen the second option used.

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