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I've heard it tons of times from people, media, the internet and everywhere, but I guess I was too afraid to ask what does the first and second it indicate? I assume both are not indicating the same thing because it's plain redundant.

Bonus question: I remember my English teacher said never use the same pronoun (like it) twice in a sentence, especially they are supposed to indicate different things. Can I safely assume "It's worth it" is an exception from this?

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    "my English teacher said never use the same pronoun (like it) twice in a sentence" - this is not a strict rule. Your writing might be clearer if you don't use the same pronoun twice, but it isn't a rule and there are plenty of times when people do it. (Like I just did in that sentence!)
    – stangdon
    Aug 31, 2021 at 11:25
  • @stangdon Clever! 😆 Aug 31, 2021 at 14:58

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It's worth it, usually means, it's worth the effort/time/money to acquire "it".

A colloquialism that you wouldn't find in formal writing.

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