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In the below sentence is the prepositional phrase "at the same time" modifying "the two opposing players?" or "crashed. It seems like it would be describing "the two opposing players.

At the same time, the two opposing players crashed into me.

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    It's modifying the clause, "the two opposing players crashed into me".
    – gotube
    Sep 1, 2021 at 5:20

1 Answer 1

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Most importantly, as written, the sentence doesn't emphasize that the crashes are at the same time. For that, you'd write "The two opposing players crashed into me at the same time." But at the beginning of the sentence, it sounds like a prepositional phrase supplying a setting, relating this sentence to the previous one, like "meanwhile": "I tripped over my shoelaces. At the same time, he crashed into me."

But to answer your question: If the sentence were "The two opposing players crashed into me at the same time," then "at the same time" modifies the verb "crashed."

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  • Does "the two opposing players crashed into me at the same time" equal the sentence "at the same time, the two opposing players crashed into me."
    – Anna
    Sep 15, 2021 at 2:44

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