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Most of the vaccines and several therapeutics in development, including ZMapp, are specific for one particular species of ebolavirus 36. Thus, these agents currently in development would not likely be suitable for broad-spectrum empiric management of suspected EVD, such as would be required for immediate use in the event of a filovirus outbreak before identification of the virus had occurred.

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"Such as" can be used to introduce examples or evidence, such as in this example:

Elephants eat plant matter, such as leaves, twigs and shrubs.

In your example it talks about 'agents in development' which would not be suitable for "broad-spectrum empiric management of suspected EVD", and then gives an example of when that would be necessary by adding "such as would be required for immediate use".

I don't think it is an example of ellipsis - where you omit unnecessary information. That tends to refer to shortened, informal speech. In your example, nothing has been 'omitted'. In fact, it is quite formal language. In my own example above, there is no need to keep repeating the word "eat" over and over ("elephants eat leaves, they eat trees, they eat shrubs..."). Likewise in your example there is no need to say "such as the broad-spectrum empiric management of suspected EVD required", when you've just referred to "broad-spectrum empiric management of suspected EVD".

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  • So basically I can substitute "such as" with "which"?
    – Luke
    Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 11:59
  • @user141319 In this example, yes!
    – Astralbee
    Commented Sep 3, 2021 at 21:09

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