1

Is it natural to combine these two parts of the sentences if we speak about one's health? Could the beginning of the sentence by itself say about one's health, for example, 'he is catching a cold'?

There is something wrong with me, I don’t feel well.

There is something wrong with me, I don’t feel so good.

There is something wrong with me. (Could it mean he is catching a cold?)

1 Answer 1

2

When you talk about not feeling well on a particular occasion, we commonly use present continuous: I am not feeling well (note that feeling good is less formal and can be used without connection to health condition). So the best way to put it would be:

There is something wrong with me (you can also say Something is wrong with me), I am not feeling well.

By itself,

There is something wrong with me.

needs context to reveal what it means, otherwise it is ambiguous. It can refer to something in me that I can't seem to control, or something about my health but it is not clear what (it may include catching a cold, but that can only be clarified through context).

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .