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I paid one dollar for candy, and I paid two dollars for chocolate.

Can I say like this?

“I paid one dollar(1) and two dollars(2). I bought candy(1) and chocolate(2) respectively.”

3 Answers 3

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The two short statements can/should be joined:

I bought a family pack of candy and chocolate. I paid only two dollars and one dollar respectively.
I bought [a family pack of] candy and chocolate for [only] one dollar and two dollars respectively.

I paid $1 and $2 for [a family pack of] candy and chocolate respectively.

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You can, but why would you? It is just about the most confusing way you express yourself.

So don't do that.

Instead how about:

I paid one dollar for candy, and I paid two dollars for chocolate.

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The two sentences are clearly and directly related to each other, so yes, you can.

In non-written contexts, you can also refer to an ordered list by gesturing at a set of things, so it can be entirely non-verbal. The only requirement is that the listener or reader must be able to determine what ordered list you are referring to with the "respectively".

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