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I was wondering if both of them means the same in the following sentences, that is 'all things I can'.

I'll do all I can to help.

I'll do everything I can to help.

If so, can I replay 'everything' with 'all' in the sentence 'We have completely different opinions. I disagree with everything she says.'

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all and everything have the same meaning. everything is only a pronoun, but all can be a determiner, pre-determiner, pronoun and adjective.

For pronoun usages, either is usually acceptable, though all is rather more formal, for example:

All will be revealed at the product launch.

The relative pronoun that is often omitted in informal speech and writing: your first two sentences could be written as

I'll do all [that] I can to help.
I'll do everything [that] I can to help.

Because all is more formal, that is less likely to be omitted after all than after everything, especially in written English. This NGram graph shows the effect quite nicely.

Looking at your third sentence, it is perfectly possible to use all in place of everything but, because all is more formal, you would be less likely to omit the relative pronoun in the all version, especially in writing.

I disagree with everything [that] she says.
I disagree with all [that] she says.

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If so, can I replay 'everything' with 'all' in the sentence 'We have completely different opinions. I disagree with everything she says.'


I would say No, the reason being that all encompasses everything but it does not mean everything. The meaning of everything is all things. But all has different associations. We can however use all that

In the example I'll do all I can to help the implication is

I'll do all (the things) I can to help

However

I disagree with all she says.

is incorrect

All as a determiner, all comes before articles, possessives, demonstratives and numbers. In this case as a demonstrative we should use that.

I disagree with all that she says.


This, that, these and those are demonstratives. We use this, that, these and those to point to people and things. This and that are singular. These and those are plural.C.E.D

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  • that can be many things. "I disagree with all that" -> demonstrative pronoun. "I disagree with all that stuff" -> demonstrative determiner. "I disagree with all that she says" -> relative pronoun. There's more. dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/that
    – JavaLatte
    Sep 7 at 11:21
  • @JavaLatte but if you disagree with the use of that then you must mean ...**".I disagree with all of what she says"** At that point I would think we are getting pretty close to an agreement.
    – Brad
    Sep 7 at 11:23
  • I don't disagree with the use of that in the sentence "I disagree with all that she says": I simply disagree with your analysis of that as a demonstrative in that sentence. It's a relative pronoun.
    – JavaLatte
    Sep 7 at 11:28

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