1

I give a few situations below:

a) Suppose today is Saturday, and I started working on all of my five projects simultaneously on Monday. I continuously worked on them for 5 days and today I might finish them all.

b) Suppose today is Saturday, and I started my five projects one after another on each subsequent day, starting from Monday. I continuously worked on them and today I might finish them all.

c) Suppose today is Saturday, and I started working on all of my five projects simultaneously on Monday. Some of the projects finished earlier than today. For example, the second and third project finished on Tuesday and Friday respectively. The others continue up to the present day.

d) Suppose today is Saturday, and I started my five projects one after another on each subsequent day, starting from Monday. Some of the projects finished earlier than today. For example, the first and second project finished on Monday and Thursday respectively. The others continue up to the present day.

Now consider these sentences, please:

  1. I have been working on these five projects since Monday.

  2. I have worked on these five projects since Monday.

Q: Can I use any of (1) and (2) (maybe with some additional context/information) to describe the above four situations?

2 Answers 2

2

We typically use "since" to mean from one time to the present. For that reason, the present perfect continuous "have been working" is correct:

I have been working on these five projects since Monday.

If you wanted to say how long you had worked on the projects so far, you could use "have worked" and state a finite amount of time, for example:

I have worked on these five projects all week.

2
  • I have been working on these five projects since Monday.

have been working emphasizes the activity of working from a time in the past until the present.

  • I have worked on these five projects since Monday.

have worked is just saying it started on Monday and continues on to the present time, which is the time of speaking.

Both versions relate to the present time of speaking.

If the situation is finished, you'd say:

  • I worked on x for five days* or I was working on x for five days, which means in the present you have no longer doing that.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .