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When researching appositives, I have noticed that none of the provided examples (that I can find), such as this sample of my research, demonstrate one appositive modifying two nouns. Here is a simple example of what I mean:

Jack and Jill, David's children, walked up the hill.

In this sentence, 'Jack and Jill' (two nouns) are being renamed 'David's children.' I often find myself doing this, so I suspect that 'Jack and Jill' function as one, meaning that the appositive makes sense. Am I correct?

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    Yes: "David's children" is an appositive modifier of the NP coordination "Jack and Jill".
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 15:57

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That is correct English. The subject of the sentence is named twice. Jack and Jill are David's children. And David's children are named Jack and Jill.

The noun phrase "David's children" is an appositive modifier of the noun phrase coordination "Jack and Jill".

This is context dependent:

My brother and his friend, John went shopping.

Contextually we understand John is the name of my brother's friend, and not the name of a team composed of "My brother and his friend". There is no true ambiguity here.

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    Peter, Paul, and Mary, a singing group, were famous in the 1960s. Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 14:44
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    Indeed, but "Peter, Paul and Mary, their niece, went on a camping trip."
    – James K
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 15:35
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    It might be helpful to mention that the NP "David's children" is an appositive modifier of the NP coordination Jack and Jill. Some people wrongly think that it's the other way round.
    – BillJ
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 17:21
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    Mentioned ......
    – James K
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 17:28

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